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KS3 History

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Key Stage 3 Course Information Page

Course Name : History

 

Outline

Pupils will extend and deepen their chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning.

Pupils will identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time. They will use historical terms and concepts in increasingly sophisticated ways. They will pursue historically valid enquiries including some they have framed themselves, and create relevant, structured and evidentially supported accounts in response.

They will also understand how different types of historical sources are used rigorously to make historical claims and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.

 

Curriculum Content

Autumn Term 1: What did the Romans do for us?
(Baseline Assessment – Historical Skills)

Autumn Term 2: Why did the Normans invade?
(Causation Assessment – Why did William win the Battle of Hastings?)

Spring Term 1: How did religion affect power in Medieval Britain?
(Interpretations Assessment – Was King John a good or bad king?)

Spring Term 2: Was life in Medieval Britain all muck and misery?
(Change and Continuity Assessment – Medieval Life Homework Project)

Summer Term 1: How did men become Kings?
(EXAM – War of the Roses and Tudor dynasty)

Summer Term 2: How did the Tudors change Britain?
(Source Skills Assessment – How did Elizabeth I use propaganda?)

Autumn Term 1: How did the relationship between the King and the people change?
(Interpretations Assessment – Was Oliver Cromwell a hero or a villain?)

Autumn Term 2: How did the ideas of revolution spread around the world?
(Causation Assessment – Revolution Case Study Homework Project)

Spring Term 1: How did Empire and Industry change Britain?
(Source Skills Assessment – Attitudes towards Empire)

Spring Term 2: How did ideas of equality and freedom change Britain?
(Speaking Assessment – Abolition of Slavery Speech)

Summer Term 1: How did women achieve political equality with men?
(EXAM – Suffragettes)

Summer Term 2: How has Birmingham developed?
(Change and Continuity Assessment – Local History Homework Project)

Autumn Term 1: How did 1 bullet kill 20 million people?
(Interpretation Assessment – Was Haig a butcher or a hero?)

Autumn Term 2: Why was WW1 not ‘the war to end all wars’?
(Causation Assessment – Why did WW2 start?)

Spring Term 1: Why has genocide been so prevalent in the 20th century?
(Source Skills Assessment – Holocaust Source Selection Homework Project)

Spring Term 2: How has conflict changed the modern world?
(Significance Assessment – Which 20th century events can be considered landmarks in history?)

Summer Term 1: How has Britain changed in the 20th century?
(Change and Continuity Assessment – Britain Through The Decades Group Presentation)

Summer Term 2: Begin GCSE curriculum

How classes are grouped

Set by ability in collaboration with other humanities subjects

Set by ability in collaboration with other humanities subjects

Set by ability in collaboration with other humanities subjects

Assessment (including homework)

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term.

They are invited to complete a draft for an interim deadline so that they can review their work and improve their level if they want to.

The final version is awarded a level and written feedback is given to each student.

Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis.

For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Reflective study tasks will be set on a regular basis to encourage students to reflect on their learning and develop their skills further.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term.

They are invited to complete a draft for an interim deadline so that they can review their work and improve their level if they want to.

The final version is awarded a level and written feedback is given to each student.

Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis.

For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Reflective study tasks will be set on a regular basis to encourage students to reflect on their learning and develop their skills further.

Students submit at least one formal assessment per term.

They are invited to complete a draft for an interim deadline so that they can review their work and improve their level if they want to.

The final version is awarded a level and written feedback is given to each student.

Throughout the course verbal feedback is given to students and they are supported in lessons.

Students are provided with target levels at the beginning of the course in order to motivate students and also to aid intervention.

Students are also encouraged to review their feedback and devise their own targets for development on a regular basis.

For homework, students complete at least one extended project during the year.

Reflective study tasks will be set on a regular basis to encourage students to reflect on their learning and develop their skills further.

How to support your daughter

  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current religious and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current religious and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.
  • Asking questions about homework, proofreading and supporting students in the application of the marking criteria.
  • Encouraging students to access current religious and moral issues via a range of media.
  • Supporting the revision of key words and their meaning.